Current and upcoming exhibitions

The sitting room in the common areas of Prince Eugen’s home. Photograph: Anders E Skånberg

The Prince´s Private Apartments

Permanent exhibition

In 1905 Prince Eugen’s home at Waldemarsudde was ready for him to move in to. The ground floor, was the more official part of the home and included the public rooms consisting of a hall,dining room, drawing room, flower room, library and study. In these rooms Prince Eugen’s own paintings are displayed alongside art from his collection. Together with the room furnishings, which saw the Prince mixing old and new with inherited and bought pieces, an individual home with an individual style was created. The prince’s Private Apartment remain largely as it was during the prince’s lifetime and are today open to the public.


John Bauer, Bianca Maria och trollen, 1913, akvarell på papper, 31,5 x 33,5 cm. Foto: Bukowskis. Bild beskuren.

Spellbound – John Bauer and the Magic of Nature

September 5, 2020–May 23, 2021

Magical, animated nature with deep, mysterious forests and elemental creatures such as trolls, elves and water sprites are presented in this exhibition, in which painting, graphic art and sculpture from the turn of the century 1900 interacts with photography and installation art by contemporary artists. The central artist in the exhibition is John Bauer, who with his illustrated fairy-tale collection Bland tomtar och troll (Among gnomes and trolls) has profoundly influenced the perception of the mysticism of nature and the forest and their magical powers. In the exhibition, the art of Bauer will be presented in dialogue with that of his Nordic contemporaries – Theodor Kittelsen and Louis Moe from Norway and Swedish sculptor and Art Nouveau artist Agnes de Frumerie are some examples.

The exhibition also addresses the magic of nature in contemporary Nordic art. Night vision, the photographic series by Maria Friberg from 2019, is inspired by the art of John Bauer and reflects the views of young adults on nature as a bolt-hole but simultaneously something under threat. In Friberg’s works, the fusion of man with nature is closely linked to notions of resistance, activism and change in our time.


Karl Dunér, Sven, 2019. Ljudskulptur. Foto: Lasse Forsberg

Karl Dunér – Islands

November 14, 2020 – March 28, 2021

The middle of November sees the opening of an exhibition with artist and stage director Karl Dunér. The presentation features mechanical puppets, sculpture and film. The puppets steer themselves and interact in a kind of performance. The technique builds on an encounter between the Japanese Bunraku tradition and contemporary electronics. Each puppet has its own breathing and movements. And, as is the case with the other mechanical sculptures in the exhibition, no action is repeated in this exciting pioneering performance.


Courtney Makins, Absent Bodies, 2019/2020 skapat i samarbete med Designmuseum, Danmark. Foto: Mariya Pepelanova för Office Magazine, 2020. ©Mariya Pepelanova.

Future Nordic Fashion

April 24–October 3, 2021

The new generation of fashion designers explore the outer perimeters and norms of fashion. They ask questions and outline a new, personal and self-critical future. This exhibition features selected visionary creations made by a few outstanding graduatefashion designers who took part in the Nordic competition Designers’ Nest. The themes highlighted in the exhibition, in clothing and films, are boundaries between fashion and art, identity and sustainability. The exhibition is produced by Prince Eugen’s Waldemarsudde and co-curators Ane Lynge-Jorlén, PhD in fashion theory and history and CEO of Designers’ Nest, and Philip Warkander, senior lecturer in fashion studies at Lund University.


Sigrid Hjertén, Schweizersjön, 1935, olja på duk, 73, 5 x 92,5 cm. Foto: Prins Eugens Waldemarsudde

Nature Lyricism and colour harmonies – Highlights from the art collection

June 12–August 22, 2021

This summer a major exhibition of works from Waldemarsudde’s rich collection will be on show. The presentation highlights Prince Eugen’s seminal contribution as a collector and patron, focusing on late-19th century plein-air painting, fin-de-siècle mood painting, and modernist explorations of colour and form in the early decades of the 20th century. Among the well-known favourites, visitors can look forward to seeing works by Eugène Jansson, Leander Engström, Sigrid Hjertén and Isaac Grünewald, but also discover hidden treasures from the Museum’s collectionthat are rarely shown to the public. Expect an enjoyable experiencewhere paintings, sculptures  and crafts interact beautifully with exquisite flower arrangements.


Hanna Pauli, Konstnären Venny Soldan-Brofeldt, 1886 – 1887. Olja på duk, 125,5 x 134 cm. Göteborgs konstmuseum Fotograf: Hossein Sehatlou

A room of one´s own – The role of the artist in the late nineteenth century

September 11, 2021–January 23, 2022

This exhibition celebrates how women artists from the Nordic countries conquered the role of the artist in a time of radical social change and the rise of the women’s rights movement. It explores how prominent artists such as Julia Beck, Hanna Hirsch-Pauli,
Bertha Wegmann and Helene Schjerfbeck represented themselves in their professional role in dialogue with their male contemporaries, including Edvard Munch, Ernst Josephson, Christian Krohg and Anders Zorn. Artistic training, travel, transnational encounters and the importance of exhibitions, not least the Paris Salon, are some of the themes of the exhibition. Roughly a hundred visually striking and innovative works on subjects such as self-portraits, friendship-portraits and studio interiors are featured in this research-based exhibition.


Lars Lerin, Flaket, 2007. Akvarell 105 x 155 cm. Foto: Lars Lerin

Expedition Art

October 30, 2021–February 27, 2022

Eight prominent contemporary artists – Lars Lerin, Dascha Esselius, Bigert & Bergström, Svenerik Jakobsson, Hanna Ljungh, Josef Bull, Sigrid Sandström and Johan Petterson – are featured in this experimental and innovative exhibition linked to the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat’s artists programme and residencies on the
Arctic and Antarctic. In this exhibition, fascinating issues that arise in the borderland between art and science are explored in paintings, prints, photographs, sculptural objects, light installations and film. Expedition Art is shown both indoors and
outdoors. It is co-organised with the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat and is accompanied by an interesting programme.


Nikolai Astrup, En morgon i mars, c. 1920.
Olja på duk, 65 × 46.5 cm.
The Savings Bank Foundation DNB / The Astrup Collection/ KODE Art Museums
of Bergen. Foto: Dag Fosse / KODE. Bild beskuren.

Nikolai Astrup – Visions of Norwegian Nature

February 19 – May 28, 2022

The innovative Norwegian artist Nikolai Astrup (1880–1928) is well known and loved in his own country, but so far less noted outside Norway. This will be the first monographic exhibition featuring the artist in Sweden. Now you have the opportunity to discover Astrup’s colorful and atmospheric landscape painting from Jølster in Norway, where he grew up, but also to experience his suggestive graphic work. Like his contemporary artist colleague Edvard Munch, Nikolai Astrup developed and renewed the expressive possibilities of the woodcut. Astrup’s work is permeated with the moods and mysticism of the local environment, as well as its distinctive atmosphere and light.  Nikolai Astrup also came to build an artist’s home called Astruptunet, where architecture, art, nature and garden interacts as a whole.

The exhibition includes about a hundred works, mainly oil paintings and woodcuts, and is complemented by a richly illustrated catalogue with articles by a number of prominent experts from Norway, the USA and Sweden as well as an introductory essay by the author Karl Ove Knausgård. The exhibition is also complemented by interesting lectures, guided tours and concerts as well as by a small presentation in the Bernadotte Room of paintings by Prince Eugens with Norwegian motifs and by works by Norwegian artists from the museum’s own collections.

Nikolai Astrup: Visions of Norway is organized by the Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, in cooperation with KODE Art Museums and Composer Homes, Bergen, the Savings Bank Foundation DNB, and Prince Eugen’s Waldemarsudde. The exhibition has been generously supported by the Savings Bank Foundation DNB.”

The curator of the exhibition is MaryAnne Stevens, independent curator and art historian.